The LGB without the T

It’s fair to say, I’m no fan of London. I’m not in to big noisy cities at all. I hate places that are crowded and where manners are considered a rumour of an ancient past. Conflict, even the threat of it, see’s me frozen in fear. It would take something really special, nay extraordinary, to see me making that trip down south anytime soon. To be brave enough to feel the fear and do it anyway. And, so it was.

On the 21st October 2021 such a miracle occurred. I did indeed wake up in London, having stayed overnight in Wood Green. I had woken, readied myself and then taken the tube to arrive in the political heart of our country at Westminster. There was an inevitable threat of conflict, as another section of our society didn’t want the likes of me congregating with others similar to me, and wished to make their objections perfectly clear. The utter madness and insanity of the preceding 4 years I’d witnessed meant that I no longer cared about my dislikes of big cities or my fears of conflict; I had to be right there in central London, on this day, regardless.

With a quick stop at the statue of Millicent Garrett Fawcett for a selfie en route, where I was reminded that “Courage calls to Courage Everywhere”, I arrived at the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre to represent the B of the LGB Alliances inaugural conference. The big scary counter demonstration at 8am consisted of one trans-identified-male lurking behind a tree, and two men dressed head to toe in black with a black mourning veil covering their faces, who believed themselves to represent the mourning of us gathering solely as the LGB, with no attached T. It was both disappointing and terribly dramatic all at once.

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NHS Gender Service CAN appeal puberty blockers ban

Dr Bell is right to call the Tavistock out as conversion therapy centre. Without encouraging the gender confused youth of this country to talk about all areas of their lives that are causing them harm or difficulties, we are creating assumed transgender children that might not actually be transgender at all, but actually be Lesbian, Gay or Bisexual.

For many people here in the UK, the Tavistock & Portman Gender Identity clinic was an unknown part of their highly regarded NHS Service.  They were most likely in a blissful state of unawareness that such services were now being made available to children as young as 10 years old.  Transition was no longer a treatment reserved entirely for fully developed and mature adults.  Keira Bell’s High Court judgement in December 2020 certainly achieved a new level of awareness, caused some conversations to happen, but it is clearly still not enough.

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